Clock Problems

Brian Smith BSmith at lyrix.com
Tue Dec 10 15:06:01 CST 2002


Ron,

What Dave said, plus you can create a file /etc/ntp/step-tickers that
contains one of the IP addresses Dave has below and the RedHat NTP startup
script will automatically run ntpdate against it to sync the time before
the daemon starts.  It's in the /etc/rc.d/init.d/ntpd script.

Other things to look for is a hung RTC clock on the motherboard.  'hwclock
--show' to see if the difference in times gets larger with passing time.
Is the kernel clock slow or the RTC?  Some Unixes try to sync the kernel
clock with the RTC clock, speeding up or slowing down time on the system in
the process.  Verify that your CMOS battery isn't low or dead.

Or it could be drivers/kernel like others mentioned...   clock problems are
maddening.

- Brian



                                                                                                                          
                    Dave Johnson                                                                                          
                    <dave at wangtrading.co        To:     linux-poweredge at dell.com                                          
                    m>                          cc:     rreed at ops.sgp.arm.gov                                             
                    Sent by:                    Subject:     Re: Clock Problems                                           
                    linux-poweredge-admi                                                                                  
                    n at dell.com                                                                                            
                                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                          
                    12/10/02 03:32 PM                                                                                     
                                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                          




Ron--

Assuming it's a Linux laptop, all you need is a /etc/ntp.conf
with the following entries (its good to have at least 2 clock
sources):
cat << __EOF__ >> /etc/ntp.conf
server 132.163.4.104
server 128.105.37.11
driftfile /etc/ntp/drift
__EOF__

Servers listed above taken from:
stratum-1
http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/ntp/clock1.html
stratum-2
http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/ntp/clock2.html

-----
The two biggest things are having the driftfile
and 2 or more ntp sources.

ntpd may not change your clock if its beyond a
certain threshold.  You may want to do an ntpdate
with a timesource and do a `hwclock -w` then start
ntpd.  I think ntpd -q will do something similar.

Not sure if this helps... ?

Dave Johnson
dave at wangtrading.com

---- Original Message ----
Ronald Reed rreed at ops.sgp.arm.gov
Tue Dec 10 13:19:00 2002

This isn't on a PowerEdge machine, but a C840 Latitude Laptop. The
system clock is really bad about keep proper time.

I use ntpd, but the system clock is so bad that ntpd can't seem to keep
up. Anyone have some configurations for ntpd that will help?
--
===========================
Ron Reed
Unix Systems Administrator
ARM SGP CART Site
(580)388-4053
ron.reed at arm.gov


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